Nagahama Tadao

 
Nagahama Tadao
When I think of animation there are a few people that comes to mind and Tadao Nagahama is always one of them. My collection itself heavily includes the “Robot Romantic Trilogy”, the love for which stems from my childhood days as being a second generation fan. Second generation because I did not watch these shows the first time they came out in the 70s during martial law as I wasn’t even born yet. LOL. But back to Tadao Nagahama, aside from his [url="http://hajimenokizu.rubberslug.com/gallery/master_query.asp?SeriesID=28085"]Combattler V[/url], [url="http://hajimenokizu.rubberslug.com/gallery/master_query.asp?SeriesID=25931"]Voltes V[/url] and [url="http://hajimenokizu.rubberslug.com/gallery/master_query.asp?SeriesID=25930"]Daimos[/url] aka the Romantic Trilogy, which many consider is his most important contribution to anime… Although that is probably true, not many people know of his other works. Take for example Reideen was the first transforming robot, drama was unheard of in the Super Robot genre until Tadao came along, his works spear-headed the maturity of this genre going into more complex themes like prejudice. His work also took the monster of the week, one of the greatest criticism in the super robots, and took the story beyond one episode to an actual plot! He was also one of the earliest people to do combining robots, the first one of course was Getter Robo by Go Nagai and Ken Ishikawa, but what makes Tadao's combining robots unique is that the combination was physically possible. He also directed the first 18 episodes of Rose of Versailles and also was the director of the first sports anime that was televised in Japan, Kyojin no Hoshi (Star of the Giants). Aside from that he was one of the first pioneers to bring anime out of Japan! The success of his Romantic Trilogy in other countries, well excluding the US since it was never really brought here except for one Daimos movie called “Starbirds”, had awaken outside interest in anime. He was one of the few people who collaborated with French animators to bring about the first Japanese-French anime named Ulysses 31. My only sadness is however, his career was short lived as he died just before the explosion of anime outside of Japan. He died on January 14, 1980 just a few years before anime such as Astroboy, Starblazers, Macross, Gundam, etc became popular. I shall always look at him as someone with great potential and who was one of the pioneers in anime as we come to know it today. If only he had lived longer, I think he would be in the ranks of Matsumoto. It is unfortunate that not many people know about him and his contributions but to me anime would never be the same if he didn’t come along. I am ECSTATIC to have this autograph in my gallery as I admire and respect the man for his contributions for a medium that I love. I got this from YJ in a bid war that I couldn’t walk away from. Heck, I was going to win it no matter what. It was just one of those things… For more info and since wikipedia isn't much of a help... *grin* Please read this [url="http://users.animanga.com/voltesv/creator/index.html"]short article.[/url]
 
Added: 9/1/12 From: shoppingmalljapan